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Single Plan for Student Achievement

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

 

 

 

Cyril Spinelli Elementary School

Center Unified School District

 

 

 

 

34-73973-6032924

CDS Code

 

 

 

 

Date of this revision:        October 2010

 

 

The Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA) is a plan of actions to raise the academic performance of all students to the level of performance goals established under the California Academic Performance Index. California Education Code sections 41507, 41572, and 64001 and the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) require each school to consolidate all school plans for programs funded through the School and Library Improvement Block Grant, the Pupil Retention Block Grant, the Consolidated Application, and NCLB Program Improvement into the Single Plan for Student Achievement.

 

For additional information on school programs and how you may become involved locally, please contact the following person:

           

 

Contact Person: Kristin Schmieder

Position: Principal

Telephone Number: 916-338-6490

Address: 3401 Scotland Dr., Antelope, CA 95843

E-mail Address: kriss@centerusd.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

The District Governing Board approved this revision of the School Plan on November 17, 2010.

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

School Vision and Mission                                                                                                          3

School Profile                                                                                                                             3

Analysis of Current Instructional Program                                                                                    5

Analysis of Current Educational Practice Healthy Start                                                     8

Analysis of Current Educational Practice Title 1                                                               9

Analysis of Current Educational Practice Interventions                                                   10

Student Performance Data Summary                                                                                         12

State Accountability: Academic Performance Index (API)                                                         13

Federal Accountability: Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)                                                         14         

Table 1a: Academic Performance by Grade Level Language Arts                                              15

Table 1b: Academic Performance by Grade Level Mathematics                                     16

Table 2: Annual Measurable Objectives English Language Arts                                     17

Table 3: Annual Measurable Objectives Mathematics                                                    18

Table 4: 2008 Physical Fitness Report                                                                           19

Table 5: CELDT data                                                                                                               20

Planned Improvements in Student Performance: Goal 1                                                 21

Planned Improvements in Student Performance: Goal 2                                                 23

Planned Improvements in Student Performance: Goal 3                                                25

Planned Improvements in Student Performance: Goal 4                                                 27

Use of Fiscal Resources                                                                                                            29

State Programs included in this plan                                                                                           31

Federal Programs included in this plan                                                                           32

Centralized Services Expenditures                                                                                             33

School Site Council Membership                                                                                              34

Recommendations and Assurances                                                                                            35

Acronyms and Specialized Terms                                                                                              36

School Compact                                                                                                                       39

Parent Involvement Plan                                                                                                            40

Site Council Bylaws                                                                                                                  45

School Accountability Report Card                                                                                       Blue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
School Mission, Vision, and Goals

 

Mission

At Cyril Spinelli Elementary School all students are offered an educational environment designed to foster lifelong learning and create honorable citizens.  Students develop habits of the mind which lead them to be flexible thinkers, problem solvers, and team players. 

The school environment promotes powerful learning opportunities, and provides curriculum rich in a variety of genres.  Activities are meaning centered and relevant, address various learning styles and multiple intelligences, encourage creativity, emphasize problem solving, incorporate authentic assessments, utilize technology, and reflect an appreciation and respect for cultural diversity.

 

Vision

Students attending Spinelli Elementary will develop their intellectual, aesthetic, physical and emotional abilities to their fullest potential.  All students will become avid readers and active participants in the learning process.  They will be given ample opportunities to construct meaning from the challenging, culturally diverse curriculum.  Computer technology will play an important role by engaging students in standards based instruction.  Upon graduation from Cyril Spinelli Elementary School, the students will be socially responsible, effective communicators, problem solvers, and lifelong learners.

 

Goals

·                    A safe, orderly environment for all students and staff

·                    State adopted curriculum and quality instruction

·                    Uninterrupted instructional time

·                    Frequent assessments

·                    Communication between home and school

·                    Students attending daily, on time, and ready to learn

·                    A nurturing, caring educational environment

 

School Profile

            Cyril Spinelli Elementary is one of four elementary schools in Center Joint Unified School District, located adjacent to Midtown Park in Antelope, CA within a dynamic community of economic and social diversity.  Spinelli Elementary opened in 1965 and serves students from pre-school through fifth grade with a current enrollment of approximately 340 students.

                       

To create an environment which promotes powerful learning, we provide standards-based curriculum presented in a variety of learning modalities designed to develop critical thinking skills.  We also develop an appreciation and respect for cultural diversity through our Second Step Violence Prevention Program and Life Skills Program.

Students who attend Cyril Spinelli Elementary reach or exceed the grade level standards through the Open Court Reading Program and Harcourt School Publishers Math Program in grades K-5. 

 

Following the ancient adage, “It takes a village to educate a child…”, we believe the parents and community play an integral part in the success of our students.  Therefore, we encourage the participation of parents, community members, and business partners.

 

            To our students and their families we pledge to provide an enriching education to include:

·        Alternative programs operating before school

·        An academic support network for students’ success

·        Staff development to ensure the most qualified teachers

·        Communication with families about upcoming events

·        Frequent assessment of student performance to ensure success

·        Research-based, explicit reading and math programs designed to meet the needs of all learners

·        A computer program designed to meet individual student needs

·        A Healthy Start Family Resource Center for students and their families

·        A safe and orderly environment for all students and staff

·        An environment where everyone helps one another

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis of Current Instructional Program

 

The following statements are adapted from No Child Left Behind (NCLB), Title I, Part A and the California Essential Program Components (EPC), which are in effect until the reauthorization of the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) is fully implemented. These statements may be used to discuss and develop findings that characterize the instructional program at this school for students:

  • Not meeting performance goals
  • Meeting performance goals
  • Exceeding performance goals

 

Special consideration should be given to any practices, policies, or procedures found to be noncompliant through ongoing monitoring of categorical programs.

Standards, Assessment, and Accountability

·         At Spinelli, we use a variety of assessments to determine a student’s needs.  The following assessments are used at a variety of grade levels:  the San Diego Quick (SDQ), Basic Phonics Skills Test (BPST), Basic Phonics Skills Test 2 (BPST2), Advanced Phonics Skills Test (APST), Fluency assessments, Direct Writing Assessment (DWA), the Stockton Profile, Open Court unit assessments, chapter tests in reading and math, pre and post tests in the math program, Accelerated Reader, STAR Reading Level Assessment, CST tests, and SuccessMaker reports.

·         Preschool students are administered the Desired Results Development Profile (DRDP) or the DRDP Access two times per year.  This is a state-wide accountability assessment for all publicly funded center-based child development programs.

Staffing and Professional Development

·        The District offers in-service training in Open Court, Harcourt School Publishers Math Program, and Fred Jones Behavior Management Techniques.

·        Computer training in-services are provided for the following programs:  United Streaming, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, Basic and Intermediate Word, Aeries Student Information System, Accelerated Reader, and SuccessMaker, for our state testing data, and email and Internet use.

·        An Academic Coach provides teacher training and staff development on a variety of topics to include technology, writing skills, music, art, organizational skills, and critical thinking skills.

Teaching and Learning

  • Since the 1997-1998 School Year, we have been using the Open Court Reading Series.  In the 2002-2003 School Year, we adopted Open Court 2002.  This reading program is approved by the state, and aligned to the standards.
  • In the 2001-2002 School Year we adopted the Harcourt Math Program.  In the 2009-2010 school year we implemented the Harcourt School Publishers Math Program.  With the adoption of Open Court 2002, our school-wide Title 1 program purchased $40,000.00 in supplemental materials, such as extra reading trade books and listening centers with books on CD, to address the various learning styles and modalities of our student population.  In addition, $10,000.00 was spent at the end of the 03-04 school year to replace consumable, supplemental materials to be used in the 04-05 school year.  In the 04-05 school year, each grade level spent $10,000.00 for standards-based supplemental materials to support the core curriculum and enhance the classroom environment.  In the 05-06 school year, each teacher received an allotment to purchase additional instructional materials to support the core curriculum.  In the 06-07 SY, supplemental materials were purchased to give additional support to our neediest students.  In the 07-08 school year, we implemented a learning center model where grade level students participate in small group instruction in the core subjects to meet grade level standards.  We operate two state of the art computer labs to accommodate students grades K-5.

Opportunity and Equal Educational Access

·        Students have access to small group instruction in the classroom during workshop time to pre-teach or re-teach the curriculum.

·        Every classroom has supplemental materials to support the curriculum.

·        A Title 1 teacher, an academic coordinator, and three instructional specialists pull-out and push-in to the classrooms to support the regular education program.

·         We provide breakfast and lunch programs for our students, and offer free or reduced meals to families who qualify.

·        We provide Avenues EL curriculum, SDAIE strategies, and use the EL component of the reading program for our EL students who are developing their English acquisition skills.

Involvement

·        We have a part time ELD teacher to serve the needs of our English Learners.

·        We have a school English Language Advisory Committee (ELAC) and District English Language Advisory Committee (DELAC-) for our non-English speaking parents.

·        At the beginning of each school year, we hold FAST (Family and School Team) meetings with the families of our at risk students to get necessary interventions in place ASAP.

·        We have on-site translators to bridge the language barrier between our non-English speaking parents and the school.

·        Student Study Team meetings are held weekly to address students with academic, social and/or emotional needs which impede their learning.

·        We have a Healthy Start Program/Family Resource Center on our campus offering outreach services for our students and their families.

·        Students and their families have access to our school library.

·        Student attendance is emphasized by the teaching staff, office staff, and administration by communicating with families when their child is absent.

·        Student health issues are addressed by either our district nursing department or Healthy Start/Family Resource Center office.

·         Parent support/participation/involvement is encouraged and welcomed at Spinelli.

Funding

·        We provide an intervention program for students at risk of retention.  Students most at risk come to school for additional time outside the school day to develop the skills needed to meet the grade level standards.  We offer a before school program staffed by teachers and instructional specialists.

·        Our Title 1 teacher, an academic coordinator, and three instructional specialists provide a pull-out and/or push-in program during the school day for students who are not working at grade level.  They work with the students on the grade level standards in the core curriculum.

·        All classrooms have approximately three computers for student use throughout the day.  Students in grades K-5 are provided Internet access for research projects.

·        All classrooms have listening centers to accommodate student needs.

·        All classrooms have supplemental materials in the core curriculum for student use.

·        Both of our computer labs are equipped with the SuccessMaker computer software, as well as a variety of academically sound supplemental programs.

  • Students have access to the Harcourt Math Intervention computer program, the Accelerated Reader Program, and the Read Naturally Program to build their fluency and comprehension skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALYSIS OF CURRENT EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

Healthy Start/Family Resource Center

The Healthy Start/Family Resource Center and Title 1 staffs collaboratively meet with families to support them in developing a plan and accessing the resources they need to provide a safe, healthy learning environment for their children.  These Family and School Team (FAST) plans may include an array of services available through our Healthy Start/Family Resource Center, educational supports, or assistance in accessing community resources.  Family members or school staff can initiate a FAST meeting.  We acknowledge that parents are the primary support and educators of their children and the school is the facilitator for organizing services.  We believe that successful families raise successful children.  The following services are available:

 

Academic

Health

Social/Emotional

Basic Needs

One on one and small group tutoring

Translation in Spanish and Russian to assist in accessing health services

 

Mentoring by Staff members

Referrals for housing assistance through Healthy Start/Family Resource Center

Translation services for parent/teacher conferences in Spanish and Russian

Referral and advocacy to access health services and family health education

 

Violence prevention curriculum taught  

Emergency clothes closet on the campus

English Language classes for adults

Assistance applying for low cost health insurance for children

 

Special Friends program to help students gain confidence in school

Referrals for emergency food

Toddler and caregiver class to promote language and social development

Access to free eye care through Vision Service Plan for low income students who do not have insurance

 

Friends Club to teach students to model pro-social peer interactions and problem solving

Toys for children at Christmas

Adult Education GED classes

Annual Dental screening and free dental care for uninsured students

 

Consultation for teachers and parents on child behavior and management

Host families for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals

Community donation of school supplies

Dental health care instruction through Smilekeepers

 

Child and family counseling for MediCal eligible families through Terkensha Mental Health

Services for homeless families

 

 

 

ANALYSIS OF CURRENT EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

Title 1

Spinelli Elementary receives federal money to support the needs of our underperforming students.  Our school wide Title 1 program offers the following services for students:

 

Identification of all students, kindergarten through grade 5, who are in need of supplemental instruction in Reading/ Language Arts and Math, based on assessment data.

 

A Title 1 Teacher and Academic Coordinator 

 

Provide individual and small group instruction in Reading/ Language Arts and Math.

3 Instructional Specialists

 

Provide individual and small group instruction in Reading/ Language Arts and Math, and offer emotional and behavioral support to the students.

 

Step Up To Writing

 

A writing program designed to be used across the curriculum in grades 1-5.

Extended Day Programs

 

Before school classes to assist at-risk students in Language Arts and Math.

Supplemental Materials

 

Literature, literacy resources, computer software, and various manipulatives are available for classroom use.

 

Math Facts in a Flash

 

Assists students in mastering math facts from basic addition to decimals, squares, and fractions.

Harcourt Math Intervention

 

Software which directly supports the classroom math curriculum.

 

Computer Labs

 

Students have access to one of our two computer labs.   These labs are used for computer-assisted instruction and research projects.

Computer-assisted instruction

 

Students have access to the SuccessMaker program. This individualized program addresses specific Language Arts and Math needs. It is available in grades, Kindergarten through 5th.

 

 Accelerated Reader

 

A computerized reading incentive program, which helps to motivate students to read by setting individual reading goals and assessments.

 Read Naturally Program:  

 

A computerized reading program focusing on reading fluency and comprehension skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALYSIS OF CURRENT EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

Intervention Program

Spinelli offers a variety of intervention programs designed to meet the physical, social, emotional, and academic needs of the students.  We offer programs before, during and after school to ensure we develop productive members of society.

How do we meet the physical needs of our students?

 

Approximately one-fourth of our students eat breakfast at school daily, and three-fourths eat school lunch. 

 

We have a clothes closet for students in need. 

 

Through a partnership with the Antelope Mom’s Club, we are able to provide school supplies, backpacks, and clothing for students.

 

We refer families for immediate food needs.

We host families for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals.

We provide toys and clothing to needy families at Christmas. 

How do we meet the social needs of our students?

 

The social needs of our students are met through the Second Step Violence Prevention curriculum used in classrooms weekly. 

 

Primary Intervention Program

 We have PIP on our campus for students who may “fall through the cracks”; giving them tools for developing friendships. 

 

Spinelli Buck Store

Every Friday students who received Spinelli bucks for “doing the right thing” get to shop for items in our Spinelli Buck store. 

 

To recognize and show the importance of positive behavior choices, we have Tiger Days where we celebrate “Students of the Month”, and give all students the opportunity to be team players and build self confidence by creating performances for the student body. 

School Clubs:

Walking Club

 

 

Peacekeeper Program

Students who qualify must maintain good grades, be role models for their peers, and have the skills to help students resolve conflicts in a peaceful manner. 

We have a buddy check in system where students who have difficulty making appropriate social choices check-in with a staff member on a daily basis.

P.E. Interns

We have a partnership with CSUS Physical Education Department, where we host P.E. Interns for eight week cycles as student teachers.  Our students learn a variety of physical fitness activities, and develop a teamwork approach to sports activities.

 

 

How do we meet the emotional needs of our students?

 

Spinelli was awarded a $400,000.00 Healthy Start Grant in June of 2000.  Our Healthy Start program is still in operation today, extending the grant far beyond the initial three years of funding.

Through Terkensha Mental Health, our families have access to mental health services increasing students’ abilities to function in school, at home, and in the community.  These services are provided on the Spinelli campus. 

We are fortunate to have staff members who check-in daily with students needing emotional and/or academic support. 

Occasionally we make home visits to support students who need that connection to be successful in school.  

 

How do we meet the academic needs of our students?

 

Being a School-wide Title 1 school, we offer a variety of interventions to meet the needs of all learners.  These interventions can be extra materials to support the curriculum, instructional specialists or teachers working with students, computers and computer labs, and/or Accelerated Reader books.

UnitedStreaming, an online video clip program designed to offer real-life visual and audio cues on a number of educational topics, provides students with background knowledge necessary for concept attainment. 

 

Our English Learners receive instruction in English Language via the Avenues Curriculum, and SDAIE strategies throughout the school day.  All students participate in the Step Up to Writing program.

We have a Title 1 teacher, and academic coordinator, and 3 instructional specialists who work one-on-one or in small groups with students using a pull-out/ push-in model throughout the school day to bring struggling students up to the grade level standards.

We work with our site Child Development Center (on-site daycare) to bridge the gap between school and home by providing grade level textbooks so their staff can help students complete homework during “homework club” at CDC.

Staff Development to improve and strengthen our teachers’ abilities to deliver a quality education.  We provide in-services on behavior management, strategies and techniques for reaching the reluctant learner, curriculum delivery, and technology to extend student learning.

 

To increase school attendance, we also recognize students with perfect attendance at our Tiger Days.  We make daily phone calls home for every student absence. 

 

For a struggling student, the day begins with before school intervention, where the student works on reading and/or math skills.    Before school intervention also utilizes one-on-one sessions with a teacher or instructional specialist.  This program is offered daily.

 

STUDENT PERFORMANCE DATA SUMMARY

School Demographic Characteristics

October, 2009 CBEDS

Male
Female

 

Am. Indian or Alaska Native

 

 

 

 

Asian

 

 

 

Pacific Islander

 

 

 

 

Filipino

 

 

Hispanic

or

Latino

 

African American

Not

Hispanic

 

 

 

 

White

Multiple or no response

Am.

Indian

 or

Alaska

 Native

 

 

 

 

Asian

 

 

 

Pacific

Islander

 

 

 

 

Filipino

 

 

Hispanic

Or

 Latino

 

African

American

Not

Hispanic

 

 

 

 

White

Multiple

or no response

 

 

 

 

Total

Kdg

1

2

 

 

5

3

11

 

1

4

 

 

6

1

7

1

42

1st

 

3

 

 

4

4

8

4

 

 

 

 

4

1

10

4

42

2nd

 

4

 

 

6

 

6

 

 

4

 

 

9

2

6

2

39

3rd

 

3

 

 

3

2

12

 

 

2

1

 

6

4

18

3

53

4th

1

3

1

 

2

1

14

1

 

2

 

 

4

7

9

 

44

5th

 

1

 

 

6

 

14

2

 

1

 

1

6

5

14

1

51

Ungraded

2

3

1

 

5

8

10

 

 

1

 

 

3

4

9

 

46

Total

4

17

2

0

31

18

75

7

1

14

1

1

38

24

73

11

317

 

Ethnic/Racial (STAR)                  Percent       Parent Educational Level (STAR)  Percent

African American                                         12               *Parent with a response                          100

American Indian                                 2              Of those with a response                       

Asian                                                          10                           Not a high school graduate                               13

Filipino                                                          0                          High school graduate                         33

Hispanic or Latino                                        25                           Some College                                   35

Pacific Islander                                                           1                         College graduate                                               14

White (not Hispanic)                                     47                           Graduate                                             5                      Two or more races                                         1

These percentages may not sum to 100 due to                   *This number is the percentage of student

responses of: other, multiple, declined to state,                  answer documents with stated parent

or non-response.                                                              education level information.

 

Participants in Free or Reduced        Percent            Average Parent Educational Level         2.65

Price Lunch (STAR)                                    73              The average of all responses where                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 “1”represents “Not a high school                                                                                                                                                                          Graduate” and “5“ Graduate school.”

                                                          Percent                                                                                Percent

English Learners (STAR)                            23           Fully credentialed teachers                  100

Reclassifies Fluent English (RFEP)           11

Students with Disabilities (STAR)              21

Multi-track year-round school                    no          Teachers with emergency credentials      0

 

School Mobility (STAR)                              89                                                                       Number

This is the percent of students who were                      Enrollment in grades 2-11 on first

Counted in October 2008 CBEDS.                                Day of testing (STAR)                            230

 

Class Size (CBEDS)                             Average          Number of students excused from            1

Grades K-3                                                                  testing (STAR) per parent written request

Grades 4-5                                                       

                                                                               Number of Students Tested (STAR)       229

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State Accountability: Academic Performance Index (API)

The API is a system for ranking schools statewide according to results of student performance based on the Student Testing and Reporting System (STAR). The ranking includes ten deciles, decile one being the lowest. 

 

 

STAR

2010

Percent

Tested

 

Number

Included

in the

2010 API

 

 

2010

API

(Growth)

 

 

2009

API

(Base)

 

 

2009-10 Growth

Target

 

 

 

2009-10

Growth

 

Met Target

School-wide

 

 

Met Target

Comparable Improvement

100

201

828

843

A

-18

yes

yes

 

Student Groups

Number of Pupils Included in

2010 API

 

 

 

Numerically Significant

 

 

2010

Subgroup API Growth

 

 

2009

Subgroup

API

 Base

 

 

2009-10

Subgroup

Growth Target

 

Met

2009-2010

Subgroup

Growth

Target

African American, not Hispanic

25

no

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

American Indian or Alaska Native

 3

no

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Asian

20

no

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Filipino

 1

no

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hispanic or Latino

    47

no

726

n/a

n/a

n/a

Pacific Islander

2

no

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

White not Hispanic

100

yes

846

863

A

yes

Economically Disadvantaged

149

yes

825

831

A

yes

English Learners

58

yes

802

833

A

yes

Students with Disabilities

44

no

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

 

 

        API Scores from 2009 to 2010                         Growth in API from 2009 to 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal Accountability: Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

Met AYP Criteria                              English-Language Arts       Mathematics

            Participation Rate                             Yes                                                      Yes

            Percent Proficient                             Yes                                                      Yes

            API                                                      Yes                                                      Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 1a: Academic Performance by Grade Level-Language Arts

API

PROFICIENCY LEVEL

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE INDEX (API) DATA BY GRADE

Grade: 2

Grade: 3

Grade: 4

Grade: 5

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘08

‘09

‘10

 

Percent 

At or Above Proficient

%

65

73

53

48

48

29

56

79

80

33

49

70

 

Percent 

              At Basic

%

20

21

24

35

33

40

23

17

13

47

41

21

 

Percent   

Below Basic

%

9

4

13

12

15

28

16

0

7

14

6

9

 

Percent

   Far Below Basic

%

6

2

10

5

4

3

5

3

0

5

4

0

TOTAL NUMBER /

 % OF STUDENT POPULATION

#

54

52

51

60

46

65

61

59

56

57

49

57

%

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100


Conclusions indicated by the data:

1.      In grades 2 and 3,  there was a noticeable decline in the percentage of students scoring at or above proficient compared to the prior year.  There was a significant increase in the number of students scoring in the BB and FBB categories. 

 

2.      In grades 4 and 5, there was a significant increase in the percentage of students scoring at or above proficient compared to the prior year.  These grade levels should be commended for eliminating students in the FBB category for ELA.

 

Conclusions indicated by the data:

1.     In grades 2 and 3,  there was a noticeable decline in the percentage of students scoring at or above proficient compared to the prior year.  There was a significant increase in the number of students scoring in the BB and FBB categories

 

2.     In grades 4 and 5, there was a significant increase in the percentage of students scoring at or above proficient compared to the prior year.  These grade levels should be commended for only having one student  in the FBB category for Math.

 

 Table 1b: Academic Performance by Grade Level-Mathematics

API

PROFICIENCY LEVEL

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE INDEX (API) DATA BY GRADE

Grade: 2

Grade: 3

Grade: 4

Grade: 5

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘08

‘09

‘10

 

Percent

At or Above Proficient

%

69

84

61

73

74

42

64

75

70

30

54

74

 

Percent 

  At Basic

%

20

12

22

13

11

34

18

24

29

30

22

21

 

Percent   

Below Basic

%

4

4

14

10

15

20

15

2

1

26

20

4

 

Percent

   Far Below Basic

%

7

0

3

3

0

4

3

0

0

14

4

1

TOTAL NUMBER /

 % OF STUDENT POPULATION

#

54

52

51

60

46

65

61

59

56

52

50

57

%

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Table 2: English-Language Arts Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOS)

English-Language Arts
Target  56.8 %
Met all percent proficient rate criteria? Yes

 

GROUPS

Valid Scores

Number At or Above Proficient

Percent At or Above Proficient

Met 2009 AYP Criteria

Alternative Method

Schoolwide

201

122

60.7

Yes

 

  African American or Black (not of Hispanic origin)

25

  17

68.0

--

 

  American Indian or Alaska Native

3

--

--

--

 

  Asian

20

  12

60.0

--

 

  Filipino

1

--

--

--

 

  Hispanic or Latino

47

26

55.3

--

 

  Pacific Islander

2

--

--

--

 

  White (not of Hispanic origin)

100

63

63.0

Yes

 

Two or More Races

2

--

--

--

 

  Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

149

85

57.0

Yes

 

  English Learners

58

28

48.3

No

 

  Students with Disabilities

44

26

59.1

--

 

 

Conclusions indicated by the data:

1.   Over 60% of the students scored At or Above Proficient.

 

2.    All significant population subgroups excluding English Learners met AYP criteria in ELA.

Table 3: Mathematics Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOS)

Conclusions indicated by the data:

1.      Over 66% of the students scored At or Above Proficient in Math.

 

2.      All significant population subgroups met AYP criteria in Math.

Mathematics
Target  58.0 %
Met all percent proficient rate criteria? Yes

 

GROUPS

Valid Scores

Number At or Above Proficient

Percent At or Above Proficient

Met 2009 AYP Criteria

Alternative Method

Schoolwide

201

134

66.7

Yes

 

  African American or Black (not of Hispanic origin)

25

15

60.0

--

 

  American Indian or Alaska Native

3

--

--

--

 

  Asian

20

13

65.0

--

 

  Filipino

1

--

--

--

 

  Hispanic or Latino

47

32

68.1

--

 

  Pacific Islander

2

--

--

--

 

  White (not of Hispanic origin)

100

70

70.0

Yes

 

Two or More Races

2

--

--

--

 

  Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

149

98

65.8

Yes

 

  English Learners

58

39

67.2

Yes

 

  Students with Disabilities

44

29

65.9

--

 


Table 4: 2009 Physical Fitness Report

2010 Physical Fitness Report

Summary of Results

Physical Fitness Tasks

Total Tested

% in HFZ

(Healthy Fitness Zone)

% not in HFZ

(Healthy Fitness Zone)

Abdominal Strength

57

96.5

  3.5

Aerobic Capacity

58

82.8

17.2

Body Composition

61

71.5

29.5

Flexibility: Shoulder Stretch Left

58

41.4

58.6

Flexibility: Shoulder Stretch Right

58

44.8

55.2

Trunk Strength

59

96.6

  3.4

Upper Body Strength

58

70.7

29.3

Conclusions indicated by the data:

1.   At least 70% of all fifth graders met or exceeded the requirements in each of the physical fitness tasks excluding the areas within flexibility.

                                                                         


Table 5: California English Language Development (CELDT) 09-10 Data

 

Grade

California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Results

Advanced

Early Advanced

Intermediate

Early Intermediate

Beginning

Total Tested

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

K

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

14

2

14

8

57

2

14

0

0

14

100

2

0

0

4

27

8

53

2

13

1

7

15

100

3

2

11

3

16

11

58

3

6

0

0

19

 

100

4

0

0

6

43

7

50

1

7

0

0

14

 

100

5

1

14

4

57

1

14

1

14

0

0

7

100

Total

5

7

19

28

35

51

9

13

1

1

69

 

Conclusions indicated by the data:

1.   7% of the EL students scored Advanced.  28% scored Early Advanced.  51% scored Intermediate. 13% scored Early Intermediate, and 1% scored Beginning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planned Improvements in Student Performance

The school site council has analyzed the academic performance of all student groups and has considered the effectiveness of key elements of the instructional program for students failing to meet API and AYP growth targets. As a result, it has adopted the following school goals, related actions, and expenditures to raise the academic performance of student groups not meeting state standards:

SCHOOL GOAL # _1_

Scores will reflect a two percent increase in the number of students performing in the Proficient and Advanced categories on the CST assessment in Language Arts.

The students in the following subgroups and grade levels will participate in this goal:

  • All students, Title 1, English Learners

Anticipated annual performance growth for each group:

  • Two percent increase in the number of students performing in the Proficient and Advanced categories on the CST assessment in Language Arts

Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:

1.        STAR leveled reading assessment

2.        CST for Language Arts

3.        Administrator and teacher meetings

4.        Title 1 support

5.        Accelerated Reader

6.        Open Court and Fluency Assessments

7.        20 Day Standards based assessments

8.        FAST meetings

9.        DWA, Step Up To Writing Program

10.     Cut-Points Checklist

11.     Before school Intervention program

12.     California Frameworks Blueprints

13.     SuccessMaker

14.     Best Instructional Practices staff development

15.     Read Naturally Computer Program

16.     San Diego Quick, BPST, APST Assessments

17.     SIPPS Reading Program

18.     SDAIE Strategies, Avenues Curriculum

Group data to be collected to measure academic gains:

  1. 20 day standards assessment
  2. Accelerated Reader reports
  3. STAR leveled reading reports
  4. Report Cards
  5. EL report cards
  6. Frequent progress reports to parents
  7. DWA assessments
  8. Open Court assessments
  9. CST data for Language Arts
  10. SuccessMaker reports
  11. SIPPS Assessments
  12. San Diego Quick, BPST, APST Assessments
  13. EL Standards Checklists
  14. Fluency Assessments
  15. District Writing Rubric

 

Actions to be Taken to

Reach This Goal

Start /Completion Date

Proposed Expenditures

Estimated

Cost

Funding

Source

 

Extended learning time before school

 

 

Push-in or Pull out programs during the day

 

 

Supplemental Services (AR, Read Naturally, SuccessMaker)

 

ELL Avenues curriculum

 

Small group instruction during workshop

 

The administration meets with the teachers at least 3 times throughout the year to discuss student progress

 

Staff Development

 

 

Communication by the teachers with parents

 

 

 

School and/or classroom newsletter with web pages and other resources for parents to access which support student learning. 

 

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intervention teachers & Instructional Specialists

 

1 teacher, 1 Academic Coordinator & 3 Inst. Spec.

 

Currently have programs

 

 

Currently have curriculum

 

None

 

Substitutes for teacher mtg.

 

 

Materials/handouts

 

 

Email, telephone, weekly grade reports, ABI access to grades and attendance

 

Copy Paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$18,000.00

 

 

$250,000.00

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

None

 

$1,000.00

 

 

$1,000.00

 

 

$500.00

 

 

 

$500.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title 1

 

 

Title 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title 1

 

 

District

 

 

General Fund

 

 

General Fund

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planned Improvements in Student Performance

The school site council has analyzed the academic performance of all student groups and has considered the effectiveness of key elements of the instructional program for students failing to meet API and AYP growth targets. As a result, it has adopted the following school goals, related actions, and expenditures to raise the academic performance of student groups not meeting state standards:

SCHOOL GOAL # _2_

Scores will reflect a two percent increase in the number of students performing in the Proficient and Advanced categories on the CST assessment in Mathematics.

Student groups and grade levels to participate in this goal:

  • All students, Title 1, English Learners

 

Anticipated annual performance growth for each group:

  • Two percent increase in the number of students performing in the Proficient and Advanced categories on the CST assessment in Mathematics.

Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:

    1. CST for Mathematics
    2. Administrator and teacher meetings
    3. Harcourt School Publishing (HSP) Math Assessments
    4. Computer generated programs for remediation
    5. FAST meetings
    6. Cut-Points for Retentions checklist
    7. California Frameworks Blueprints
    8. Best Instructional Practices staff development
    9. Title 1 support
    10. 20 day Standards assessments
    11. Intervention program
    12. Pathways to Algebra
    13. Timed math fact tests
    14. Facts in a Flash computer program
    15. Think Central  Math Supplements

 

Group data to be collected to measure academic gains:

  1. 20 day assessment data
  2. Report Cards
  3. Frequent progress reports to parents
  4. HSP math assessments
  5. SuccessMaker data
  6. Timed math facts data

 

 

 

Actions to be Taken to

Reach This Goal

Start /Completion Date

Proposed Expenditures

Estimated

Cost

Funding

Source

 

Extended learning time before school

 

 

Push-in or Pull out programs during the day

 

 

 

Supplemental Services (Facts in a Flash, SuccessMaker, Harcourt computer Math software)

 

Think Central Math Program

 

Small group instruction during workshop

 

The administration meets with the teachers at least 3 times throughout the year to discuss student progress

 

Communication by the teachers with parents

 

 

 

School and/or classroom newsletter with web pages and other resources for parents to access which support student learning. 

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

Intervention teachers & Instructional Specialists

 

1 teacher, 1 Academic Coordinator, & 3 Instructional Specialists

 

Currently have programs

 

 

Currently have program

 

None

 

Substitutes for teacher meetings

 

Email, telephone, weekly grade reports, ABI Gradebook access 

 

Paper

 

$18,000.00

 

 

$250,000.00

 

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

 

 

$1,000.00

 

 

None

 

 

 

$500.00

 

Title 1

 

 

Title 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Fund

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planned Improvements in Student Performance

The school site council has analyzed the academic performance of all student groups and has considered the effectiveness of key elements of the instructional program for students failing to meet API and AYP growth targets. As a result, it has adopted the following school goals, related actions, and expenditures to raise the academic performance of student groups not meeting state standards:

SCHOOL GOAL # _3_

Scores will reflect a two percent increase in the number of ELL students performing in the Proficient and Advanced categories on the CST assessments.

Student groups and grade levels to participate in this goal:

  • All ELL students

 

Anticipated annual performance growth for each group:

  • Two percent increase in the number of ELL students performing in the Proficient and Advanced categories on the CST assessments.

 

Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:

    1. CST scores
    2. DWA scores
    3. Step Up To Writing Program
    4. Administrator and teacher meetings
    5. Standards Assessments and curriculum
    6. California Frameworks Blueprints
    7. ELL checklists for the writing standards
    8. SDAIE strategies
    9. Preteach/reteach concepts to ELL
    10. Journal writing, quick writes
    11. Best Instructional Practices staff development
    12. Title 1 support

 

 

 

 

Group data to be collected to measure academic gains:

  1. Standards assessment data
  2. CST scores
  3. DWA scores
  4. Step Up To Writing scored writing
  5. Report cards
  6. Frequent progress reports to parents
  7. Open Court assessments

 

 

Actions to be Taken to

Reach This Goal

Start /Completion Date

Proposed Expenditures

Estimated

Cost

Funding

Source

 

Academic Coordinator will provide staff development in Step Up To Writing

 

Students standards assessments

 

DWA assessments

 

Written work using the Step Up To Writing

 

SDAIE strategies used in classroom instruction

 

Communication by the teachers with the parents regarding students’ progress towards reaching grade level standards

 

 

 

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planned Improvements in Student Performance

The school site council has analyzed the academic performance of all student groups and has considered the effectiveness of key elements of the instructional program for students failing to meet API and AYP growth targets. As a result, it has adopted the following school goals, related actions, and expenditures to raise the academic performance of student groups not meeting state standards:

SCHOOL GOAL # _4_

Through school wide programs, average daily attendance will increase while referral and suspension rates decrease.  Students will develop strategies for positive social interaction through our buddy check in system.

 

Student groups and grade levels to participate in this goal:

  • All students
  • Staff assigned to students participating in the buddy check in system
  • Title 1 staff monitoring lunch recess

 

Anticipated annual performance growth for each group:

  • 96% of the students will attend school each day
  • Students participate in 2nd Step Violence Prevention and class meetings

 

Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:

  1. Weekly attendance registers
  2. Aeries Reports
  3. Teacher lesson plans showing 2nd Step and class meetings
  4. Buddy check in charts (staff to students)
  5. Student of the Month

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group data to be collected to measure academic gains:

 

1.   Actual weekly attendance sheets

 

2.   Actual number of suspensions and referrals

 

Actions to be Taken to

Reach This Goal

Start /Completion Date

Proposed Expenditures

Estimated

Cost

Funding

Source

Telephone calls by the teachers and office staff inquiring about an absence

 

Monthly attendance letters

 

Buddy check in system implemented at each recess and lunch

 

2nd Step Violence Prevention and class meetings

 

FAST Plans

 

Walking Club

 

Promoting student wellness

 

Mentoring by staff members

 

Student recognition for perfect attendance at Tiger Days

 

Playground rules to include rewarding positive behavior choices

 

Extrinsic Rewards

 

Peace Keepers

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

August 10 - May 2011

 

 

Staff

 

 

Office Staff and Principal

 

None

 

 

Currently have materials

 

Teacher Subs

 

Coordinator and prizes

 

Currently have materials

 

Currently have materials

 

Certificates and prizes

 

 

Currently have materials

 

 

Prizes and certificates

 

Academic Coordinator

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

$1,000

 

$5,000

 

None

 

None

 

$1,000

 

 

 

 

 

$1,000

 

$150

 

 

 

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

Title 1

 

Grant

 

None

 

None

 

Student Body

 

 

 

 

 

Student Body

 

Student Body


Use of Fiscal Resources

 

The following fiscal practices apply to the use of funds generated through the Consolidated Application:

 

The state fiscal year is the period from July 1 to June 30. Funds not spent during this period become "carryover funds," to be budgeted for use the following fiscal year. Districts may allow carryover to remain at the school that generated the funds or may aggregate unspent funds from all schools and redistribute them according to the formula appropriate for each program. State law does not limit the amount of carryover funds.

 

The federal fiscal year is the period from October 1 through September 30. However, we are allowed to spend federal funds beginning the previous July 1. Thus, the period of allowable expenditure extends for 15 months. Title I law limits the amount of funds that may be carried over from the previous fiscal year to 15 percent, except for agencies that receive less than $50,000. A waiver of this restriction may be requested from the State Board of Education once every three years.

 

Eighty-five percent of the funds from certain categorical programs must be used for direct educational services at schools. This limitation applies to:
  • Economic Impact Aid, State Compensatory Education Program
  • Economic Impact Aid, Limited-English-Proficient Program
  • Title I, Part A, Improving Basic Programs

 

Up to 15 percent may be spent for administrative costs incurred at the school and district office in support of these programs.

 

Expenditures are allowable if they:

  • Provide an effective means of achieving the purposes of the program funding source
  • Are a reasonable use of limited resources
  • Are necessary to achieve the goals of the plan
  • Provide supplementary services for eligible students
  • Do not fund services required by state law
  • Do not pay for what, in the absence of these categorical funds, would be provided by the general fund

 

This definition meets the federal requirement that expenditures of funds "supplement, and not supplant" state and local expenditures.

 

The district must reserve funds from the Title I, Part A, Basic Grant Program for:

·        Costs of parent involvement (1% minimum) and professional development (5 to 10 %)

·        Program Improvement schools, whatever is needed for costs of public school choice, transportation, and supplemental educational services, up to 20 percent of the district allocation.

The district may reserve funds from Title I, Part A, for:

·        Serving community day school students

·        Capital expenses for Title I programs operated at private schools

·        Salary differentials

·        Preschool

·        Summer school

·        Before school, after school, and school year extension programs

·        Neglected students

·        Homeless students

·        Assistance to schools

The district may also reserve funds for:

·        Indirect costs of administering state and federal programs

·        Repayment of disallowed expenditures

 

Funds received through the Consolidated Application must be used to reach school goals for improving the academic performance of all students to the level of state standards. In so doing, care must be exercised to ensure that each funding source is used for the purposes for which the funds are allocated, and for eligible students.